Inspired by the words of revered Indigenous leader Vincent Lingiari, ‘that land ... I still got it on my mind’, this exhibition reflects on the Gurindji Walk-Off, a seminal event in Australian history that reverberates today. The Walk-Off, a nine-year act of self determination that began in 1966 and sparked the national land rights movement, was led by Lingiari and countrymen and women working at Wave Hill Station (Jinparrak) in the Northern Territory.
 
Honouring last year’s 50th anniversary, curator and participating artist Brenda L. Croft has developed the exhibition through long-standing practice-led research with her patrilineal community and Karunkgarni Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation. Lingiari’s statement is the exhibition’s touchstone, the story retold from diverse, yet interlinked Indigenous perspectives. Still in my mind includes photographs and an experimental multi-channel video installation, history paintings, digital platforms and archives, revealing the way Gurindji community members maintain cultural practices and kinship connections to keep this/their history present.
 
Curator: Brenda L. Croft, in partnership with Karungkarni Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation
 
Artists include:

Brenda L. Croft
Biddy Wavehill Yamawurr Nangala
Jimmy Wavehill Ngawanyja Japalyi
Leah Leaman Yinpingali Namija
Dylan Miller Poulson Japangardi
Connie Mosquito Ngarmeiye Nangala
Ena Oscar Majapula Nanaku
Sarah Oscar Yanyjingali Nanaku
Violet Wadrill Nanaku
Rachael Morris
Pauline Ryan Kilngarri Namija

Authors:  Brenda L. Croft, Penny Smith, Felicity Meakins.
Curator: Brenda L. Croft, in partnership with Karungkarni Art and Culture Aboriginal Corporation
Other creators/contributors: Smith, Penny, 1940- author. Meakins, Felicity, author
Copyright: © 2017 The University of Queensland, the artists and authors

148 pages, full colour, soft cover
ISBN: 9781742721859 (paperback)
Published by The University of Queensland Art Museum, 2017
RRP $25.00 including GST
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Still in my mind: Gurindji experience, location and visuality